Doctors, Who also Happen to be Muslim

Fatima Fahs | Woman of Power | Project Heard

 

A couple of weeks ago, I faced another unfortunate, racist interaction with a patient I was trying to treat. I got in my car that day, still parked in the hospital lot, called my mom and cried. I cried my eyes out. I could hear the pain in her voice as she coaxed and comforted me, promising me that for all the horrible patient encounters I've had--plenty more appreciative, future patients were still out there.

Reflecting on that encounter for the past couple of weeks, I've had several thoughts:

  • Does this patient know what I've sacrificed and been through to get to this point, the pinnacle of my medical school career, just months before graduating as a physician?
  • Why does a piece of cloth over my head discount the white coat on my shoulders?
  • Has she ever met a Muslim face-to-face before?
  • Were her hurtful words a reflection of the tainted images and stories seen in the news?
  • Is this lady going to vote for Trump too?!

As I near the end of my medical school career and anxiously await match day and graduation, I can't help but feel overwhelmed by all that I've gone through to get to this point. I think back to all the sleepless nights as an undergrad, cramming for my biology or organic chemistry finals. I think about the occasions I've missed and times I've sacrificed with loved ones for school. I think about the early mornings my alarm blares at 4:30am and I drag myself to the hospital. I think about the anxiety-provoking board exams I studied months for. And I think about my dad, who sacrificed so much for his family, praying they'd have a true chance at the American dream. Being belittled by a patient I was striving to heal (again) felt like my work thus far was laughable and insignificant. What encouraged me though, was thinking about all the other Muslim, hijab-wearing physicians and physicians-in-training I know who are keeping their heads up despite this all.

Therefore, this blog post has become very important to me. I want to introduce you to some bad-ass, amazing, determined, smart and special women in my life. They are all physicians or physicians-in-training, they are all American, oh, and yes--they so happen to wear the hijab and be Muslim too:

Emman Dabaja | Project Heard

Emman Dabaja
Medical School: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
Specialty Interest: Pediatrics

Susan Edlibli | Project Heard

Susan Edlibli
Medical School: Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
Specialty Interest: undecided

 

Badrea Elder | Project Heard

Badrea Elder
Medical School: Wayne State University School of Medicine
Residency: Beaumont Troy
Specialty: Family Medicine

Nour Al-Hadid | Project Heard

Nour Al-Hadidi
Medical School: University of Michigan Medical School
Residency: University of Michigan
Specialty: Internal Medicine

Maria Diab | Project Heard

Maria Diab
Medical School: University of Damascus School of Medicine
Residency: Wayne State University 
Specialty: Internal Medicine

Sarah Jukaku | Project Heard

Sarah Jukaku
Medical School: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
Residency: New York Presbyterian Cornell University
Specialty: Psychiatry

Omaima Boukhari | Project Heard

Omaima Boukhari
Medical School: Wayne State University School of Medicine
Residency: Wayne state University/ Beaumont-Oakwood
Specialty: Physical Medicine and Rehab

Marwa El-Bohy | Project Heard

Marwa El-Bohy
Medical School: Wayne State University School of Medicine
Residency: Helen DeVos Children's Hospital
Specialty: Pediatrics

 Nada Beydoun | Project Heard

Nada Beydoun
Medical School: Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Residency: Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
Specialty: Internal Medicine

Hebah Hefzy | Project Heard

Hebah Hefzy
Medical School: Northeastern Ohio Medical University
Residency: University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Fellowship: Vascular Neurology, Henry Ford Hospital
Specialty: Vascular Neurology

 

The important thing for you to know is that these women are not only Muslim and in medicine. Among them are mothers, wives, artists, poets, runners, foodies, fashionistas, international aid-workers, researchers, philanthropists, and activists. They are just as "American" as the next person. And just in case you were wondering, all of them have fabulous hair, too.

The funny thing is, this list is still only a fraction of the Muslims I know who are physicians, let alone other healthcare practitioners (pharmacists, PAs, OTs, PTs, nurses, etc). It also doesn't include the plenty of Muslim women physicians who choose (yes, I said choose) not to wear the hijab.

What unites people who work in healthcare is their ability to put the patient first. When you go in for a check-up or end up in the emergency room, you trust your doctor with your life. You divulge your biggest secrets and most embarrassing truths (sometimes you divulge too much, just sayin'). You feel comfortable knowing that your physician's purpose is to help and heal you. You trust they will make judgment calls in your best interest. So why should it be any different of an experience if your physician so happens to have an extra piece of cloth on her head?

That's right, it shouldn't.

So, the next time you see some crazy portrayal of Muslims in the media, or you question the motive of what a Muslim's holy book commands of them, I want you to think of these women. I want you to remember their faces and their names. Not only have the defied stigmas of what it means to be a woman or minority in medicine, they're also doing it while being obvious and bold representations of their religion.


Dr. Fatima Fahs lives and practices in Michigan.
Original post: http://eatpaintheal.blogspot.com/2016/02/heal-doctors-who-also-happen-to-be.html

/ Print
Posted by Dr. Fatima Fahs in Wellness

Comments


Be the first to comment
Name*
E-mail*
Comment* 500 characters max
0 Pending Comments
 Keep me updated of follow-up comments!
Most Recent

By Marsha Bonhart
September 07, 2017 Category: Wellness

I was in third grade when I started snooping in my older sisters high school literature books. I had all I needed with Dick and Jane, Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, the girl with the crazy braids and freckles (whats her faceah, yeah, Pippy Longstocking). Then there was Nancy Drew who began to annoy me because her stories all ended the same. Yawn. But the classics were much more interesting and expanded my vocabulary. So each time I snuck into my sisters bedroom to tackle the stanzas of the 18th century, Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, my heart pounded with the way Samuel Taylor Coleridges words sang to me. As a little kid, what was most memorable about the long, poetic tale of an old, guilt-ridden sailor were the words, water, water, every where nor any drop to drink. Stuck at sea during a violent storm with his dying crewmates and the ghost of a huge dead bird, there was so much water yet they dared not drink it. Seawater is not palatable and would only make you thirstier because of its salt content.

By Dr. Fatima Fahs
February 09, 2017 Category: Wellness

A couple of weeks ago, I faced another unfortunate, racist interaction with a patient I was trying to treat. I got in my car that day, still parked in the hospital lot, called my mom and cried. I cried my eyes out. I could hear the pain in her voice as she coaxed and comforted me, promising me that for all the horrible patient encounters Ive had--plenty more appreciative, future patients were still out there. Reflecting on that encounter for the past couple of weeks, Ive had several thoughts: Does this patient know what Ive sacrificed and been through to get to this point, the pinnacle of my medical school career, just months before graduating as a physician? Why does a piece of cloth over my head discount the white coat on my shoulders? Has she ever met a Muslim face-to-face before? Were her hurtful words a reflection of the tainted images and stories seen in the news? Is this lady going to vote for Trump too?! As I near the end of my medical school career and anxiously await

By Marsha Bonhart
September 23, 2016 Category: General

By: Marsha Bonhart I wish you good health. That includes the happiness and peace of mind that accompany it. If you are a believer, you can find that salutation in the Book of John, I pray that you may enjoy good health and that all may go well with you. If your spirituality takes another direction, know that Buddha states, to keep the body in good health is a duty, for otherwise we shall not be able to trim the lamp of wisdom and keep our mind strong and clear. Or, the author William Londen, to insure good health: eat lightly, breathe deeply, live moderately, cultivate cheerfulness and maintain an interest in life. Each of these writings connects the mind and body to the pursuit of healthy living. The connection, according to common dictionaries, is based upon taking into account the physiological, psychic and spiritual relationships between the state of the body and that of the mind. It means how what we think can affect how we physically feel. The theory is centuries old. Once

Project Heard: In Association with

Connect With Us

© , ProjectHEARD Powered by Virteom